Pain management

Pain management

Touch therapies used as part of a pain management programme. There is a pulsed electromagnetic therapy pad (also used for pain management) under the blanket

Touch therapies used as part of a pain management programme. There is a pulsed electromagnetic therapy pad (also used for pain management) under the blanket

My pain-relief programmes are ideal in many situations including post-surgical care, after trauma or injury, long-term discomfort in older animals or in those with chronic illness.  

Is my animal in pain?

Dogs and cats tend not to complain about pain in quite the same way as a person. If experiencing longer-term discomfort, these animals are unlikely to cry or moan but may show one or more of the following signs:

  • Lameness
  • Moving “stiffly”, sometimes with difficulty turning
  • Slow and hesitant on getting up or lying down
  • Self-grooming less often than before, or less effectively (cats)
  • Reduced appetite (though some painful animals will still eat)
  • Constantly licking one part of the body (this tends to suggest either discomfort or an underlying skin irritation)
  • Twitching, backing away or otherwise seeming uncomfortable when stroked or touched
  • Resting in a different position, e.g. no longer able to curl up to sleep

If you notice any of the above, then do discuss with your own vet who can make an initial assessment and help to decide whether analgesics (pain-relief medications) and/or further tests are required.

Many cases benefit from rehabilitation techniques in addition to medication, especially if pain is severe or has become chronic.

I provide a range of very safe pain-relief techniques that can be used in addition to or, if necessary, instead of, medication:

  • Gentle manual therapies including soft tissue mobilization
  • Pulsed electromagnetic energy (PEME) therapy
  • Low level LASER therapy
  • Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS)
  • Heat and cold therapies

I also provide:

  • Movement therapies that “teach” animals to move in a more efficient way, thus improving mobility in painful animals.
  • Therapeutic handling and touch techniques, including Tellington touch. These can help animals to “feel better” in association with medical and pain management.

If appropriate, I adjust the dosage of pain-relief medication during therapy, add in extra medication if required, and help to arrange further investigation (e.g. x-rays) if this becomes necessary.

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